Christians and Porn – reader response

see no evil

Speak no evil, see no evil, hear no evil?

I got a lot of responses from my last post, “Christians and Pornography.” I got a lot of “Amen”s and “thank you for saying it”s. I was really glad to see those. For those rejecting things that have become common in our culture, it sometimes feels like we might be all alone. Nice to know there are others.

From some, I got objections. Some objected that I didn’t focus on violence. I agree that depicted violence is a problem – though in a slightly different way, see the comments to the last post – but it wasn’t my focus.

Some people justified why they just don’t think this material is as bad for them as I make it out to be. I disagree with those people, but I’ve always intended this to be a place for provoking thought and conversation. If everyone agreed, I would probably be keeping it too tame and generic. And it’s good to hear the other side. My wife tells me I’m not right about everything. (She doesn’t really. She’s incredible and constantly affirming. That just sounded good right there.)

But then I received the below from an anonymous responder. (I’m okay with anonymous response when it’s of a confessional nature like this.) I thought it was perhaps the most helpful and honest response of all. He provides something I may have left out: avoiding cultural temptations is difficult. I suspect he says a lot of what many of us feel. I’m leaving it in the exact form he sent it. I hope it’s helpful to you…

An Anonymous Response to “Christians and Porn

Confession time: there is no doubt that I have seen some of those movies, and I will admit that I like some of those movies. However, I don’t “consciously” think I like those movies because of porn, usually I think they are really funny-but, I digress.

I think anyone that tries to defend watching any of these types of movies is being disingenuous with themselves and God. There is ABSOLUTELY NO WAY you can legitimize watching any of these things other than pure, selfish enjoyment – which you can not describe as being Holy or even close.

I throw myself right in there; I know when I am watching these shows that I shouldn’t; but, my normal excuse would be “it isn’t that big of a deal, I’m not REALLY contributing or acting certain ways because of this—it’s innocent for me.” I know that doesn’t cut it; and it shouldn’t if I want to be sanctified through Christ. I need to be better. It isn’t easy—THAT IS WHAT PEOPLE NEED TO ADMIT . . . but, Jesus told us it wouldn’t be easy. And if we are being honest, most “Christians” DON’T want to be sanctified; they want to go to church and say all the right things without the work . . . Now, please don’t take this as being sanctimonious. I am not near where I need to be; and, I can admit that I know that and I really WANT to be better.

As an additional comment; I would also say that movies including language are right up there for me as being unholy. I REALLY like the standard of kids-in-mind for their rating system. . . We just need to find that “line” that you are talking about for each area.

Great post again; very convicting, and certainly something I will be praying about more often.

The “kids in mind” rating system has me thinking at what point do we decide the age that someone is “allowed” to engage what we would deem unholy content? What I mean is this – when does content not appropriate for a three-year-old or five-year-old suddenly become acceptable?

Legally, there are ratings and laws in place to protect children from specific content – violence, sex, etc. Would we say these ratings are in effect only because certain ages can’t handle and process particular “adult” content and themes well? Might we also agree that certain ages just shouldn’t be privy to certain content? If we admit the latter, then I think we have to say there is something pure in children that we want to protect and do not want to defile with inappropriate media, etc. As Christians, shouldn’t that be a sign that perhaps those things may be impure for our souls as well and thus should be avoided?

I’m not trying to make a case for only watching G-rated movies or to boycott anything above a PG-13 rating. Likewise, this isn’t a commentary on censorship. (I tend to side with John Milton’s approach to censorship in the 17th century, but that’s a completely different discussion.) These are simply some initial off-the-cuff thoughts that I thought I’d contribute after reading this latest post. I’m sure there is further perspective I should take into consideration, so I welcome any feedback.