Why Catechesis Now?

catechumen

This isn’t the kind of catechumen we’re working toward.

If you’ve been reading for a while, you’ve seen that I have a great interest in catechesis. I believe this ancient Christian practice is desperately needed in the church today.

I’m excited to see that I’m in good company! Please go read this article by Tim Keller: “Why Catechesis Now?” It succinctly articulates why we need to bring back this “almost completely lost” practice.

A snippet:

The church in Western culture today is experiencing a crisis of holiness. To be holy is to be “set apart,” different, living life according to God’s Word and story, not according to the stories that the world tells us are the meaning of life. The more the culture around us becomes post- and anti-Christian the more we discover church members in our midst, sitting under sound preaching, yet nonetheless holding half-pagan views of God, truth, and human nature, and in their daily lives using sex, money, and power in very worldly ways […]

This is not the first time the church in the West has lived in such a deeply non-Christian cultural environment. In the first several centuries the church had to form and build new believers from the ground up, teaching them comprehensive new ways to think, feel, and live in every aspect of life. They did this not simply through preaching and lectures, but also through catechesis.

Some other things I’ve written on catechesis:
Why we’re teaching our kids a catechism
How is it with your soul?” — a question we ask every week in catechesis groups
2 more questions to ask and be asked every week
How Sunday School created a theologically illiterate American Church
Why the United Methodist Church needs a catechism
Do catechisms create parrots?

And go see the Echo Catechism that we developed for use in our community. 98 tweet-length questions and answers to address the most important historical Christian beliefs, along with the Apostles’ Creed, Lord’s Prayer, and 10 Commandments.

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